Rally at CCCU Conference

by Carl Millender

Good gardeners know that in order to truly deal with a weed, you must address it at its root. Well, that is just what we did today as we visited the Council of Christian Colleges conference in Dallas, Texas. While we have been working with the CCCU for the last year in our organizing for the ride, we have received what can at best be described as mixed messages from the council and its members. While the council has been courteous towards us, they have made it quite clear that they do not support us in our efforts to create discussion on GLBT issues on member campuses. So, as always, we continued on our mission to go into places where, whether we are wanted or not, our voices are needed.

In the morning, we all rose to yet another early morning to continue our vigilant non-violent fight for justice. Unfortunately, no matter how noble your cause, it can never energize the body. So, as I stood outside the conference in vigil, I could feel my legs beneath me ache. My body, along with many of the other riders, was ill. That, coupled with the little sleep we are coffered while on this treacherous trail, left me so tired I found it hard to even hold up the pamphlets I was given to hold. But just like every day since I began this ride, I reminded myself that I’m not here because I want to be. I’m here on this ride because nobody should have to fight for the rights we are fighting for and it saddens me to think that there are people out there saying I am spending my time fighting for special rights. The right to live openly and honestly is not a special right, but it is adamantly denied to so many students on these campuses. So as I stood there, every bone in my body aching for two hours, I just thought of all the students at all the campuses who are suffering in ways I can’t fathom. So I went on, more tired than I have ever been in the entirety of my life.

After our vigil was over, many members of the group chose to attend a reception for CCCU schools; however, I was far too tired to attend and can’t say much about it. But I have heard from those who did attend that the conversations were indeed fruitful and that many made contact with people at the schools we have yet to visit. I am glad that at least the CCCU was open to us joining their members for a reception, although I have to wonder when we will truly be offered a seat at the table.

Equality Riders蔘サ Message to CCCU: Remember History, 蔘�epent of Your Homophobia蔘

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SOULFORCE PRESS RELEASE: March 31, 2006
For Immediate Release
Contact: Richard Lindsay, 646-258-7193
richard@equalityride.com
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(Dallas, TX) – Today at the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities International Conference the Soulforce Equality Ride stood in vigil in honor of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) students who are not welcome at religious colleges and universities. The CCCU is a coalition of nearly 200 mostly evangelical colleges and universities. The theme of the conference, which takes place every five years, is appropriately enough entitled "Significant Conversations."

The Riders stood outside of the Gaylord Texan Resort with community members in hopes that the CCCU would recognize the importance of conversation about the needs of LGBT students within their schools.

Rev. Dr. Cindi Love, executive director of the Universal Fellowship of Metropolitan Community Churches attended the vigil and said, "We’re calling on members of the Christian community to repent of their homophobia. Throughout history religion has been used to discriminate against women and people of color; the Church has realized that this discrimination was a sin and its time for the Church to realize that the same is true of discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people."

Tonight, the Equality Ride is hosting a reception for all CCCU attendees. The purpose is to continue dialogue with administrators from schools the Ride has already visited and to begin in person conversations with administrators from schools not yet visited.

For more information on the Equality Ride visit www.equalityride.com/media.


The Soulforce Equality Ride is a journey to change the heart and mind of America on the issue of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) equality. Following in the footsteps of the Freedom Rides of the 1960’s, the Equality Ride uses principles of non-violence to confront military and religious colleges and universities with policies banning enrollment of LGBT students. The Equality Riders reflect on the lessons of history, which have shown past religion-based discrimination against women, people of color, and religious minorities to be an unacceptable abuse of the sanctity of religion. At each of the 19 schools on the 51-day bus tour, the young adult ambassadors of the Equality Ride bring this simple message to students, faculty and administrators: Learn from history; end religion-based discrimination.

The goal of Soulforce is freedom for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people from religious and political oppression through the practice of relentless nonviolent resistance.

When in Rome…

by Jarrett Lucas

We pour onto Texas A & M’s campus, an army of individuals connected by a common dream; we wish to live in a world devoid of discrimination. The diversity of our group is quite apparent. But, even more visible is our unity. With affable smiles and sincere greetings we allow our shirts to ask the question, "Would you serve with me?"

Rain does not delay our Wednesday morning rally, nor does it scare away the audience. Students, cadets, and faculty approach us, excited by our presence and interested in our message. Haven Herrin and I both speak. Although we cannot amplify our voices, we make ourselves heard, "It is time to end the ban." Our nation’s leaders have written into law the notion that gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender people are abnormal and less than. Our nation’s legislators have codified the very prejudice we seek to end. Our military, which seeks to promote and protect truth in the world, asks its own soldiers to lie about who they are so as to ensure ‘unit cohesion’. Although we cannot make people listen, we make the voices of many people heard. The "Don’t ask, Don’t tell" policy dishonors the service of its 65,000 GLBT service members and discredits the intellectual potential of their heterosexual comrades.

After the rally, Commandant John Van Alstyne proudly invites a group of Equality Riders to have lunch with Corps members in Duncan Hall. It is clear that his pride extends to us as well as his cadets. He says we are brave for acting on our beliefs. He knows we are servicing society by advocating our own liberty. Constantly quieting salutes, he traverses the large dining hall captivated by our honest, articulate discussions. At a dozen tables, Riders successfully engage the minds of students whose individualistic cerebration is often suppressed. Simple conversations about military policy quickly lead into the exchange of curious inquiries, personal testimony, and scriptural understanding. This is why we are here.

At one table a cadet asks, "What if the entire military were gay?" Despite his dismal tone, Riders respond by saying, "Then, the uniforms would be more stylish." The Riders proceed to address both ancient and contemporary militaries that allow openly gay citizens to enlist, among those many of the United States’ most powerful allies. It is explained that in regards to military service, sexual orientation is benign a characteristic as skin color. Perhaps the cadets at that table leave uncertain of where they stand. But, one thing is sure. The issue of serving with GLBT people has been personalized, and the human element of prejudice can no longer be denied.

A forum is held in Rudder Tower later in the evening. Gay students and straight allies, including the Commandant, arrive to show their support of the Soulforce Equality Ride’s current and future endeavors to end injustice. I have never seen such a diverse group gathered for a single concern; a three star general, a straight cadet, a gay student leader, a former soldier, and dozens of youth activists. But, we put our differences aside and recognize that which threads our lives: our humanity. And very much like the Corps at Texas A & M, we honor ourselves with dignity, courage, and integrity.

‘Fish,’ ‘spurs’ and ‘zips': Equality Riders experience military culture of Texas A&M

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SOULFORCE PRESS RELEASE: March 29, 2006
For Immediate Release
Contact: Richard Lindsay, 646-258-7193
richard@equalityride.com
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College Station, TX – Equality Riders visited one of the bastions of American military culture at Texas A & M University today. A & M has the largest ROTC program in the country outside of the service academies, and contributes more officers to the military through its program than any other school. Although students at Texas A & M who participate in "the Corps," or military school section of the university can be openly gay, those among the Corps who participate in the ROTC program must abide by the "don’t ask don’t tell" policy instituted by the U.S. military.

"One of the ways a country recognizes its citizens is to allow them the right to serve in its defense," said Jacob Reitan, Equality Ride co-director. "As long as lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people are unable to serve openly in the military, we are second-class citizens."

Equality Riders were met this morning by Lieutenant General (Ret.) John Van Alstyne, Commandant and Head of School of Military Sciences at Texas A & M. Commandant Van Alstyne hosted the Riders throughout the day, leading them throughout the campus and inviting them to meals with the cadets in the Corps dining hall.

"I’m pleased to see people as committed as you are to trying to change something you see wrong in our government," Van Alstyne said to the Riders. "You being here provides the cadets the opportunity to speak with people who might think differently than they do, which is an important part of their education."

Riders talked to cadets clad in khaki military school uniforms or green camouflage ROTC fatigues during lunch and dinner in the Corps dining hall. Cadets filled in the Riders on the unique military culture of the school, explaining such concepts as "fish" (freshmen members of the Corps) "zips" (senior members of the Corps) and "senior boots" (brown leather riding boots and spurs worn by seniors with their Corps uniforms). The Riders brought up the don’t ask don’t tell policy, personalizing the issue by asking cadets, "Would you serve with me?" and wearing t-shirts with the same question printed across the front. Cadets were open to the question, often considering it for several seconds before answering, but often answering in the negative.

Frequently, the conversations turned to religion, and it became apparent to many Equality Riders that religious objections to homosexuality were behind many of the cadets’ concerns about serving with openly gay soldiers.

"Duty to God and duty to country are inseparable here," said Jarrett Lucas, Equality Rider and point person for the Texas A&M stop. "We’d start off talking about a military policy and before long we were talking about the Bible. If this is the culture of the military as a whole, it explains a lot about why ‘don’t ask don’t tell’ is in place."

The Equality Ride will be in Dallas on Friday to speak with college administrators at the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities international conference. There will be a press conference on Friday, March 31 at the Gaylord Hotel Resort in Dallas at 11 AM.

The Soulforce Equality Ride is a journey to change the heart and mind of America on the issue of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) equality. Following in the footsteps of the Freedom Rides of the 1960’s, the Equality Ride uses principles of non-violence to confront military and religious colleges and universities with policies banning enrollment of LGBT students. The Equality Riders reflect on the lessons of history, which have shown past religion-based discrimination against women, people of color, and religious minorities to be an unacceptable abuse of the sanctity of religion. At each of the 19 schools on the 51-day bus tour, the young adult ambassadors of the Equality Ride bring this simple message to students, faculty and administrators: Learn from history; end religion-based discrimination.

For more information on the Equality Ride visit www.equalityride.com/media.


The Soulforce Equality Ride is a journey to change the heart and mind of America on the issue of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) equality. Following in the footsteps of the Freedom Rides of the 1960’s, the Equality Ride uses principles of non-violence to confront military and religious colleges and universities with policies banning enrollment of LGBT students. The Equality Riders reflect on the lessons of history, which have shown past religion-based discrimination against women, people of color, and religious minorities to be an unacceptable abuse of the sanctity of religion. At each of the 19 schools on the 51-day bus tour, the young adult ambassadors of the Equality Ride bring this simple message to students, faculty and administrators: Learn from history; end religion-based discrimination.

The goal of Soulforce is freedom for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people from religious and political oppression through the practice of relentless nonviolent resistance.

Photos from the Soulforce Equality Ride, March 29, 2006


Equality Riders hold rally outside of Texas A&M Corps Hall

Equality Riders hold demonstration about "Don’t Ask; Don’t Tell"

Jake and Haven speak with cadets

Pam Disel asks, "Would you serve with me?"

Jarrett Lucas leads the rally at Texas A&M

Equality Riders on the way to lunch at Corps Dining Hall

Jake reviews the troops

Jake sidetracks cadet on the way to formation

Forum with GLBTA group at Texas A&M
 

Grateful for Abilene

by Robin Reed

Sunday night, after a long day of travel from Oklahoma City to Abilene in a stuffy bus with no Freon (thus no air conditioning), we arrived at Abilene Christian University in time for a nice dinner sponsored by the university. This is the first school to offer us an official welcome and provide us with forums and the space to give presentations and attend classes and have structured dialogues with students, faculty, and staff. It struck me when we first arrived in the room to eat dinner that the smallest of courtesies — providing us with name tags — indicated that they cared about who we were and wanted to get to know us as individuals. We had some good discussions the first night with graduate students in the theology program, then a number of us went to an a capella praise service.

The following morning, we met students and staff members for breakfast at 7:30. They served us an amazing Texas breakfast of eggs, bacon, sausage, biscuits and gravy, and fruit. No one left that room hungry. We had hosts escort us to a marriage and family therapy class that had invited several of us to discuss LGBT relationships, while other riders went to a forum and gave a presentation on physical, emotional, and spiritual violence perpetuated against LGBT individuals (and others throughout history, including people of color, women, and people of other faiths). Both were well attended and students seemed interested in interacting with us in a constructive and respectful manner.

At lunch, a couple of riders (Jessie and Rebecca) told their stories of coming out, discussing the process of reconciling their sexuality with their spirituality. They were followed by a woman who discussed her struggle with her sexuality and childhood trauma and how she felt that her attraction to women was the result of an unhealthy relationship with her father. After resolving these issues through therapy and prayer, she is no longer a lesbian. The tension in the room was palpable as she concluded her story. We had discussion questions for table conversation afterward, but no one at our table felt that the tension could (or should) be ignored, so we set aside the questions and honestly met one another at the table of humanity for an important but extremely difficult dialogue. We told of some of our own struggles with attempting to change our sexual orientation and of the spiritual disconnection we felt until we realized that God loved us exactly as we were, without reservation, and that our sexual orientation was a gift from God to be lived with integrity, not a sin to be forgiven or a sickness to be healed.

I personally feel that everyone has the right to their own story and that it is not constructive to argue with someone’s experience. That said, I know that, according to a coalition of mental health associations representing nearly 500,000 mental health professionals, reparative therapy (which attempts to change an individual’s sexual orientation from gay to straight) is ineffective at changing one’s orientation and has a great potential for causing harm. So while I respect this woman’s experience, I do not believe that it can or should be the norm for all LGBT individuals. The very assumption underlying attempts to make gay people straight is that being attracted to individuals of the same sex is not a valid orientation, that there is something wrong with being gay. This is the misinformation that leads well-intentioned but misguided people to treat LGBT people in a way that makes them feel less than human. When this misinformation is backed up by religion-based discrimination, the implication becomes that God cannot and will not love people unless they are straight. This declares open season on LGBT people; violence in its many forms (physical, emotional, and spiritual) becomes tacitly accepted or at least not condemned. This oppressive environment also leads far too many LGBT people to believe that they are unloved and unlovable, which can lead to feelings of despair and attempts (sometimes successful) at suicide.

This is why we are here: To bring this issue out into the open. We want to have these conversations so people can hear that LGBT people are also made in the image of God, that God loves everyone equally, that there is nothing wrong with being gay, and that there is nothing Christian about discriminating against LGBT people. Abilene Christian welcomed us with open arms and permitted us to have these discussions with students. We sat together at the table of brother- and sisterhood, acknowledging both our disagreements and our shared humanity. No other school has given us such a welcome, and for this we applaud the administration of ACU. We were told by individuals within the administration that conversations had taken place that day that could not have happened in the classroom. Students were given the safe space necessary to ask the hard questions and, in some cases, sit with a lack of answers. We stand in the tension and wait, believing that the willingness to approach tough issues and deal with ambiguity will lead us to a place of reconciliation in the end.

I, for one, am tired but grateful.

Dialog Begins on Ending Abilene Christians Discriminatory Policy

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SOULFORCE PRESS RELEASE: March 27, 2006
For Immediate Release
Contact: Richard Lindsay, Press Liaison
Cell: 646-258-7193 Email: richard@equalityride.com
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(Abilene, TX) – Equality Riders completed a full day of presentations, discussions and worship with students at Abilene Christian University today, the first school to allow the Riders full access to campus. The school, affiliated with the Church of Christ, has about 4000 undergraduate and 800 graduate students studying in a range of liberal arts and professional programs.

"I knew this was going to be a different stop when they asked me to put on a name tag," said Jacob Reitan, co-director of the Equality Ride. "The schools we have visited so far have not given us that kind of institutional welcome."

Reitan continued, "They have allowed us to present in small classes and big auditoriums, fed us and let us worship with them. We are truly grateful for the dialogue we have had here with students, faculty and administration."

Events included Soulforce presentations on the history of religion-based violence, a theological conversation with students in training for ministry with the School of Theological Studies, a panel discussion on portrayals of sexuality in the media (with Brokeback Mountain as the starting point) and numerous informal conversations at receptions and meals held with students and faculty throughout the campus.

Equality Riders worshipped at the University Church of Christ just off campus on Sunday night, taking communion, singing and praying with about 800 students. On Monday, Equality Riders joined students in Moody Coliseum for ACU’s daily chapel service. The services were conducted in the Church of Christ tradition of unaccompanied singing with the congregation joining in four-part harmony.

"The students were thrilled to be having this conversation," said Rebecca Solomon, Equality Rider and point person for the ACU stop. "For lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender students here it’s like their school has said, ‘Yes, you do exist.’"

Despite the warm greeting extended to Soulforce Equality Riders, Abeline Christian University continues to hold a student conduct policy forbidding "homosexual behavior," which has led to students being expelled from the school.

Reitan added, "The fact remains that students can still be kicked out of ACU because they are gay. As long as that can happen, this campus is not a safe space for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender students. There are still a lot of issues to talk about here. We hope our visit is only the beginning of this discussion."

The Equality Ride will stop next at Texas A&M University in College Station, Texas on March 29th for a rally on ending discrimination towards LGBT students in the ROTC.

For more information on the Equality Ride visit www.equalityride.com/media.


The Soulforce Equality Ride is a journey to change the heart and mind of America on the issue of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) equality. Following in the footsteps of the Freedom Rides of the 1960’s, the Equality Ride uses principles of non-violence to confront military and religious colleges and universities with policies banning enrollment of LGBT students. The Equality Riders reflect on the lessons of history, which have shown past religion-based discrimination against women, people of color, and religious minorities to be an unacceptable abuse of the sanctity of religion. At each of the 19 schools on the 51-day bus tour, the young adult ambassadors of the Equality Ride bring this simple message to students, faculty and administrators: Learn from history; end religion-based discrimination.

The goal of Soulforce is freedom for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people from religious and political oppression through the practice of relentless nonviolent resistance.

Oklahoma Escape

by Jacob Neal

Oklahoma City, OK

Our first day off! What a relief! The question looming in everyone’s mind after our mentally taxing days at OBU was how should we spend this glorious day off here in Oklahoma City, the thriving metropolis of the Midwest? Bill provided us with the clear answer: breakfast at IHOP. It may not sound like an adventure, but when you gather 15 or more Equality Riders together at least two things are inevitable. One, Jesus is present, and two, you’re in for a smashing good time. The trip to IHOP was no exception. Us Equality Riders never know when the next meal will be coming, and the half of us who are vegetarian never know if the next meal will be palatable, so we laden down our table with short stacks and tall stacks and omelets and hash browns and eggs galore. The two hour feast was an experience that will live on in my mind (and tummy) for days to come.

When we arrived back at the hotel, the breakfast bunch quickly dissipated in the halls of the Habana to a myriad of tasks. Laundry was high on the list for some while others settled down for a long afternoon nap. Industrious as a busy bee, I snuggled under the covers of my voluptuous bed with my book and half-heartedly attempted to make some headway into the 1069 riveting pages of Ayn Rand’s epic novel, Atlas Shrugged. Sitting on the bed, I could hear the sound of the waves and the wind rushing through the palm trees calling my name, "Jaaaa-cob," beckoning me down to the pool. (Okay! Okay! I imagined the palm trees, but it really was a windy day — hence the waves.) Journaling on the edge of the pool, I casually dipped my toes into the leafy waters, only to find I’d lost all feeling in the lower half of my body. With the aid of my arms, I was able to extract my toes from the frigid water but from that experience decided that swimming in Oklahoma would have to be the task for another Saturday.

At 3:00 pm, we all gathered in the darkened Habana theatre (Room 214) to watch the new Jake Reitan flick. After the 7 minute MTV feature, the Equality Ride celebrities practiced signing their autographs for the hoards of fans we were sure to encounter at our next stop at Abilene Christian. Then my day got interesting — really interesting. The moment I’d been waiting for all morning finally occurred — Jonathan and his exboyfriend Nate had come to rescue me from the humdrum life I’d been leading for so long (all morning) and took me back to Nate’s house where I could experience the rapturous joy of doing my laundry. Little did I know that I was to join in a family tradition, complete with extended family and friends, shish kabobbed mushrooms and peppers, cute beer bottle identifying braclets, and a viewing of Best in Show.

Five hours later after the festivities had finally concluded, Nate gave us a lift back to the hotel. The evening ended in a flurry of activity with frantic packing and hurried preparations for the early morning departure. Content with life, I settled into bed and drifted off to sleep with dreams of welcoming Christian universities dancing in my head.

Seeds Planted at OBU

by Kayla Bonewell and Pam Disel

At every one of the Equality Ride’s 19 stops, two Riders were assigned to be the advance team. Pam Disel and I, both Oklahomans, were in charge of the Oklahoma Baptist University events. It was an amazing and daunting task to coordinate two days worth of activities between 33 activists and 1,649 OBU students, especially given the limitations placed on us by OBU because of our sexual orientation and message.

From the beginning it was my job to correspond with OBU’s Vice-President about our intentions and plans, and it was an awesome leap-of-faith to trust someone who you know is opposed to your presence on their campus and yet continue to be fully open and honest.

OBU would be the second school (Lee was the first) which allowed us on campus in a fashion that would allow dialogue with students. The V.P. told me that OBU’s expectations of us would be similar to that of Lee (which meant we could not deliver our presentations, but only talk with student’s one-on-one). OBU was even more restrictive in the fact that we were only allowed in their student center (as opposed to the entire campus) and that we were initially not able to pass our literature one-on-one to interested students as we had at Lee. It was very hard to accept their restrictions because it parallels the inferiority and unimportance with which the administration views us.

We decided to abide by their restrictions to honor the small step they had taken by allowing us on campus. In that one day we hoped we could show OBU our peaceful methods, our important message, and our pure intentions. The next day we would offer OBU a chance to take an even larger step — we would pass out our literature. We would leave behind printed versions of our dialogue which would remain even after our bus rolled away. It would be OBU’s choice of whether to allow us this action or to take action to silence us.

I truly believe it was due to the mutual trust and respect that OBU’s V.P. and I had for each other that we were allowed to pass out our literature on that second day. Granted, only being allowed to distribute our message in the student center as opposed to the entire campus was not what we would have preferred, but we chose to again honor this second small step as a gain. It was still an act of inequality, but I believe each step towards justice must be acknowledged and praised. Change is a process and my hope is that it will continue to grow even after we leave. On the second day we held a CommUNITY rally. It began with drumming on behalf of my home church (Church of the Open Arms) and proceeded with two speakers: Ryan Rolston and Reverend Scott Jones. Ryan is 22 years old and told her story of being expelled from OBU because her girlfriend kissed her cheek off-campus. Scott followed with his witness of being one of OBU’s most distinguished alums and also his knowledge of a friend who was expelled from school when he confirmed questions about his orientation to be used as evidence after suffering a brutal hate crime. Afterward we presented a newly-formed coalition consisting of local churches and organizations who have pledged to support OBU students suffering in closets of spiritual and physical violence because of the discriminatory policy at their school. The rally concluded by the passing out of mustard seeds. We have come and hopefully planted seeds of the Kingdom of God at OBU; it is now the responsibility and challenge of the community to water and nourish these seeds to their fruition. Before we left our last stop in my home state, we sang "we shall overcome" in unison.

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Another Perspective

by Pam Disel

I have mixed feelings about our visit to OBU. We were welcomed to campus but met with restrictions. We were told not to distribute literature on Thursday and on Friday we were told that only two of us were allowed to distribute literature. Both days, we were confined to the student center and were not allowed to speak with students outside this designated area.

To me, that says something about OBU’s definition of the word "welcome." It shows that "welcome" is as hollow as the "love" that is taught at OBU. A love that is spoken of freely but followed by, ‘"You’re a sinner and should change," is not the kind of love I show, or with which I reach to others.

So, OBU decided to make a statement that LGBT people are inferior, less than, the other, sinners and simply not equal. I feel I and the other Riders let the OBU LGBT students down when we neglected to stand up for them. We simply did not do all we could have done for them. At the end of the day, I felt we put the needs of the administration as more important or more worthy of action/inaction than the needs of the students who were counting on us to stand up for them, as they are forbidden to stand for themselves without serious consequences.

I am ashamed of all of this but am happy we spoke with OBU students, presented our truths, and perhaps shed new light on long standing ignorance for some. I am happy that Kayla and I were able to work with the Oklahoma LGBTQ community in forming a coalition to support and serve as advocates for current LGBTQ OBU students until OBU decides they are worthy of protection and equality on campus. I feel we’ve been given half a loaf our entire lives as LGBTQ individuals and that simply saying "thank you" for OBU reinforcing the idea that we deserve no more is an injustice. We do try our best to stand up for students/friends/family. You are the reasons we do what we do. Know that we truly love you with a deep, meaningful and lasting love. Thank you all for being appreciative of what we did manage to accomplish and look forward to much support in the future from your new coalition and from me when the Ride is over. Let’s get Oklahoma on the loving path to LGBTQ equality.